October 20, 2017

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In Memoriam

 

 Trooper Raymond A. Elliott
1920-1947

After serving in the United States Navy during WWII, Trooper Raymond Elliott settled in Groveton, NH. Trooper Elliot joined the New Hampshire State Police on July 15, 1946.

On June 1, 1947 Trooper Elliott was sideswiped by another driver while he traveled along Route 16 between Berlin and Gorham. Trooper Elliott's cruiser went off the roadway and struck a utility pole. He died as a result of the injuries that he sustained in the crash.

Trooper Elliott had served with the State Police for 11 months and was 26 years old at the time of his death. Trooper Elliott was survived by his parents and his son Wayne. 

 

 

Trooper Harold B. Johnson
1888-1948

Trooper Harold Johnson was born in North Strafford, NH and spent many years in Groveton, NH where his parents owned the Eagle Hotel. In 1940 he moved to Lancaster, NH with his wife and two daughters.

Trooper Johnson was first employed by the State Motor Vehicle Department in 1924. When the New Hampshire State Police was formed in 1937, Trooper Johnson became one of the first Troopers to join the force. As he was the most senior Trooper on the force, he wore Badge No. 1.

On October 11, 1948 Trooper Johnson was returning from a court hearing in Groveton with Trooper Frank Helms and Lancaster Police Chief Andrew Malloy. The car that Trooper Johnson was riding in collided with a Boston and Maine freight train at a railroad crossing along Route 3 near Groveton. Trooper Johnson and Chief Malloy died instantly.

Trooper Johnson was 60 years old and had served with the State Police for 11 years at the time of his death. Trooper Johnson was survived by his wife and three children.

 

Lieutenant Ivan H. Hayes
1907-1959

Lieutenant Ivan Hayes was born and raised in Strafford, NH. In 1928 he graduated from the Austin Cate Academy, the Institute of Applied Sciences and the Harvard University Medical Legal School. He married Louise MacAllister of Lancaster, NH on September 4, 1941. Lt. Hayes went on to earn a law degree from LaSalle Extension University a year before his death.

A member of the New Hampshire State Police since its inception, Lt. Hayes previously worked with the Attorney General's Office. In addition to being a fingerprint expert with the State Police, Lt. Hayes was a member of several local and national law enforcement associations. He also served as a member of various community organizations in and around Strafford.

On July 18, 1959, Lt. Hayes learned of a vehicle that was being driven wildly around the town of Strafford. He volunteered to help locate the vehicle as the trooper working that area was busy elsewhere. Approximately three hours later, a citizen discovered Lt. Hayes comatose in his cruiser along the side of the road. When another trooper arrived on the scene, it was learned that Lt. Hayes had died of a heart attack.

 

Trooper Richard Champy
1946-1978

Born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, Trooper Richard Champy was a graduate of Woodbury High School in Salem. He served in the United States Navy in the Vietnam War, before settling in Newbury, New Hampshire with his wife and two daughters.

Trooper Champy was hired by the New Hampshire State Police on January 20, 1969. He was assigned to the Troop D barracks in Bow where he was a member of the K-9 unit. He could often be found traveling with his bloodhound Smokey.

On February 3, 1978 Trooper Champy learned of a motorist who had been struck by another vehicle on his citizen band radio. The vehicle was located and Trooper Champy and Trooper Korbett pursued the vehicle as it tried to flee the scene. As they struggled to arrest a passenger of the vehicle, Trooper Champy suffered a heart attack.

At the time of his death, Trooper Champy was a nine year veteran of the New Hampshire State Police and was only 32 years old. He was survived by his wife and two daughters.  

Trooper Gary P. Parker
1959-1989

Trooper Gary Parker was born in Tarrytown, New York before moving to Gloucester, Massachusetts as a child. As a boy, his family settled in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, where he graduated from Kingswood Regional High School. He went on to graduate from Johnson State College in Vermont before working with the Wolfeboro Police Department. Trooper Parker ultimately settled in Wolfeboro with his wife and son, where he was an avid golfer and enjoyed skiing.

After serving with the Wolfeboro Police Department for six years Trooper Parker was hired by the New Hampshire State Police on September 12, 1986. He was assigned to the Troop B barracks in Milford and was eventually transferred to Troop E. Prior to being transferred to Troop E, Trooper Parker was also assigned to the DWI Unit in Concord.

November 29, 1989 was Trooper Parker's first day assigned to Troop E and he was called upon to assist Trooper Joseph Gearty. Trooper Gearty had made an arrest in Campton and had brought the subject to the Plymouth Police Department for processing. Trooper Parker assisted Trooper Gearty in transporting the prisoner from the Plymouth Police Department to the Grafton County Jail in Haverhill. As they traveled north along Route 25 near the Wentworth/Warren town line, a tractor trailer carrying a load of lumber was speeding south towards them. As the tractor trailer rounded the turn near the town line, the load shifted causing the bindings to break. The lumber crushed the cruiser that Trooper Parker and Trooper Gearty were in. Trooper Parker and the prisoner were killed instantly. Trooper Gearty was transported to Speare Memorial Hospital in Plymouth. He died as a result of his injuries on November 30, 1989. The driver of the tractor trailer was uninjured.

At the time of his death, Trooper Parker was a three year veteran of the New Hampshire State Police and was only 30 years old. He was survived by his wife, who was pregnant with their second child, and his 16 month old son.

 Trooper Joseph E. Gearty
1961-1989

Trooper Joseph Gearty was born into a large Irish-Catholic family in Norwood, Massachusetts in 1961. In 1980 he graduated from Blue Hills Regional High School in Canton, Massachusetts and went on to serve with the United States Army for three years as a military police officer. Trooper Gearty joined the New Hampshire State Police on August 31, 1984. He was eventually assigned to Troop F and settled in Rumney with his wife and son. Trooper Gearty was a fan of Irish Folk music and was known to listen and memorize Irish folk tunes in his cruiser.

On November 29, 1989 Trooper Gearty had made an arrest in Campton and had brought the subject to the Plymouth Police Department for processing. Trooper Gary Parker assisted Trooper Gearty in transporting the prisoner from the Plymouth Police Department to the Grafton County Jail in Haverhill. As they traveled north along Route 25 near the Wentworth/Warren town line, a tractor trailer carrying a load of lumber was speeding south towards them. As the tractor trailer rounded the turn near the town line, the load shifted causing the bindings to break. The lumber crushed the cruiser that Trooper Parker and Trooper Gearty were in. Trooper Parker and the prisoner were killed instantly. Trooper Gearty was transported to Speare Memorial Hospital in Plymouth. He died as a result of his injuries on November 30, 1989. The driver of the tractor trailer was uninjured.

At the time of his death Trooper Gearty was a five year veteran of the New Hampshire State Police and was only 28 years old. He was survived by his wife and their six month old son.

Sergeant James S. Noyes
1954-1994

Sergeant James Noyes was born on May 4, 1954 and was raised in Haverhill, Massachusetts. In 1972 he graduated from Haverhill High School and in 1976 went on to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from the University of Massachusetts at Boston. Sgt. Noyes settled in Madison and became actively involved with the community as he and his wife raised their three children. He served on several committees within the school system, was avid supporter of the local sports teams, and went on to become a coach.

On February 25, 1977, Sgt. Noyes was hired by the New Hampshire State Police. During his career, he worked with the Major Crime Unit, the Narcotics Investigation Unit, and the SWAT team. He was eventually assigned to the Troop E barracks in Tamworth and was the Unit Commander of the New Hampshire State Police SWAT Team.

On October 3, 1994 the New Hampshire State Police SWAT team responded to Gilford for a despondent man who had barricaded himself inside his home. The subject was distraught about the recent death of his wife and was threatening suicide. Sgt. Noyes talked to the man through a window much of the night in order to attempt a peaceful resolution. Negotiations seemed to go well as the man surrendered several guns. The man however soon became despondent again and appeared close to shooting himself. Sgt. Noyes attempted to place a percussion grenade through an open window so that other Troopers could enter the residence and end the standoff. Sadly the man opened fire on Sgt. Noyes striking him under his arm, bypassing his bullet proof vest. The man then committed suicide. On November 16, 1995 Sgt. Noyes was posthumously awarded the Medal of Valor for his bravery, which was presented to his wife Debra.

At the time of his death Sgt. Noyes was a 17 year veteran of the New Hampshire State Police and was only 40 year old. He was survived by his wife, daughter, and two sons. In December of 2001, Sgt. Noyes' oldest son followed in his father's foot steps and joined the New Hampshire State Police.

                      

Trooper Leslie G. Lord
1951-1997

Trooper Leslie Lord was born on December 10, 1951 in Weymouth, Massachusetts. His family moved to Pittsburg, New Hampshire, where Trooper Lord graduated from high school in 1971. While in high school he was one of the first cadets with the New Hampshire State Police Cadet Program. As a teenager he also volunteered as a dispatcher for Troop F.

Trooper Lord was very active in the Pittsburg community as he loved to snowmobile and acted as Head Trailmaster for the Northern Corridor. Trooper Lord worked with the town's Water Department, their ambulance service, Fire Department, and Police Department. Trooper Lord went on to serve his community as a Chief for both the Fire Department and the Police Department. He served as the Chief of Police from 1975 until 1987, when he took a position with the New Hampshire Department of Safety as a member of the Bureau of Highway Enforcement. He served as an enforcement officer until the agency was merged with the New Hampshire State Police on October 1, 1996, when he became a Trooper.

On August 19, 1997, Trooper Scott Phillips attempted to stop a vehicle in Colebrook for having too much rust. As Trooper Phillips pulled in behind the vehicle in the parking lot of LaPerle's IGA, the driver exited his truck and opened fire on Trooper Phillips with an automatic rifle. Although Trooper Phillips was wounded in the hand he returned fire, but was unable to wound the suspect, who was wearing a bullet proof vest. Trooper Lord responded to assist Trooper Phillips with the stop, not knowing about the shootout that was ongoing. As Trooper Lord pulled into the parking lot, the suspect opened fire on Trooper Lord, killing him instantly. The suspect returned to Trooper Phillips and shot him four times, execution style, killing him. The suspect stole Trooper Phillips' cruiser and drove into town where he killed Vickie Bunnell, a former town selectman and part-time judge, whom the suspect held a grudge against. The suspect also shot and killed newspaper editor Dennis Joos who was attempting to disarm him. The suspect drove to Vermont where he shot a Conservation Officer of the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game. The bullet ricocheted off of the officer's badge, saving his life. The suspect staged an ambush where he injured three more police officers, before he was finally mortally wounded.

At the time of his death Trooper Lord had served with the State Police for 11 months and was only 45 years old. He was survived by his wife and two sons.

      

Trooper Scott E. Phillips
1965-1997

Trooper Scott Phillips was born in Hyannis, Massachusetts on January 4, 1965 and was raised in Lancaster, New Hampshire. He attended White Mountain Regional High School where he graduated in 1984. Trooper Phillips went on to serve as a Military Police Officer in Panama from 1985 to 1989 with the United States Army.

After serving in the Army, Trooper Phillips returned to New Hampshire and was hired by the New Hampshire State Police on March 23, 1990. After completing his probationary year, Trooper Phillips was assigned to the Colebrook patrol in Troop F. He settled in town, where he and his wife raised their two children. Trooper Phillips was an avid skier, motorcyclist, and runner. Each year he would take part in the Special Olympics Torch Run, where he would run the nine mile stretch pushing his son in a runner's stroller. Trooper Phillips also volunteered his time by serving on Colebrook's 21st Century Committee.

On August 19, 1997, Trooper Phillips attempted to stop a vehicle in Colebrook for having too much rust. As Trooper Phillips pulled in behind the vehicle in the parking lot of LaPerle's IGA, the driver exited his truck and opened fire on Trooper Phillips with an automatic rifle. Although Trooper Phillips was wounded in the hand he returned fire, but was unable to wound the suspect, who was wearing a bullet proof vest. Trooper Leslie Lord responded to assist Trooper Phillips with the stop, not knowing about the shootout that was ongoing. As Trooper Lord pulled into the parking lot, the suspect opened fire on Trooper Lord, killing him instantly. The suspect returned to Trooper Phillips and shot him four times, execution style, killing him. The suspect stole Trooper Phillips' cruiser and drove into town where he killed Vickie Bunnell, a former town selectman and part-time judge, whom the suspect held a grudge against. The suspect also shot and killed newspaper editor Dennis Joos who was attempting to disarm him. The suspect drove to Vermont where he shot a Conservation Officer of the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game. The bullet ricocheted off of the officer's badge, saving his life. The suspect staged an ambush where he injured three more police officers, before he was finally mortally wounded.

At the time of his death, Trooper Phillips was a seven year veteran of the New Hampshire State Police and was only 32 years old. He was survived by his wife, a daughter, and a son.

May we all carry their memory in our hearts and minds as we carry out our duties, and hope we never have to add another name to this list of heroes. May they rest in peace

 





Page Last Updated: Feb 09, 2016 (10:57:53)
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